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Jun 3, 2016

CCENT Lab




Hello folks! You might be surprised that I suddenly decided to make a post in this blog. This is because I've worked with a packet tracer lab just recently as part of my CCENT class. Yes I had a CCENT class. But there's only one student. He was an aspiring network engineer, planning a career shift and I have a fair share of experience and knowledge gained from the past three years of working in this field. So I thought why not? I can share what I know and was hopeful that I could inspire another to learn the world of networking. After all I had such a fun ride, networking is hard, but fun! 

So for the final assessment I had to let him see the big picture. What is Routing really? What is Switching? What is the significance of IP? What is branch and enterprise networking? 

I taught him the basic essentials. I showed him my own technique in IP subnetting. I kept on telling him to see the pattern in everything because that's how I got it. I explained to him where Routing and Switching fit in all these. They're like the pillars of Networking. And protocols, IP Networking is also about protocols and relationships between layers, the TCP/IP model.

And so he did the lab and was able to implement branch and enterprise networking. He's preparing to take the CCENT exam in a few months.

So if you are aspiring to enter the world of Networking, learn the basic concept and try to see the big picture. Know that these protocols you will be studying are the ground where Networking stands. One can go a long way if the foundation is strong so don't rush in your study and appreciate every aspect of it.

Like always I am sharing here the CCENT Lab so more people can make use of it. To do the lab, you only need the following:

Cisco Packet Tracer (to open the PT Lab File - I used v6.1)
PDF Reader (to open the PDF Lab Manual)
Cisco CCENT/CCNA ICND1 100-101 Official Cert Guide by Wendell Odom (Optional)

Download the files
PT Lab File
PDF Lab Manual

Nov 2, 2013

OSPF-FR Troubleshooting Lab



The purpose of this lab is to present the two of the four OSPF network types that you can use with Frame Relay: Point-to-point and Multipoint and some issues you may encounter because mainly, OSPF works differently on each type. Wendell Odom in his book, CCNP Route Official Certification Guide outlined the three important points when using OSPF over Frame Relay which is basically the inspiration of this lab. 

To get started, paste the base configuration below for each router:

R1
hostname R1
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.1.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0
 no ip address
 encapsulation frame-relay
 no shutdown
!
interface Serial0/0.2 point-to-point
 ip address 10.2.12.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0.3 point-to-point
 ip address 10.2.13.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0.45 multipoint
 ip address 10.2.145.1 255.255.255.0
!
router ospf 1
 log-adjacency-changes
 network 10.2.0.0 0.0.255.255 area 0

R2
hostname R2
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0
 ip address 10.2.12.2 255.255.255.0
 encapsulation frame-relay
 ip ospf network point-to-point
 no shutdown
!
router ospf 1
 log-adjacency-changes
 network 10.2.0.0 0.0.255.255 area 0

R3
hostname R3
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.3.3 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0
 ip address 10.2.13.3 255.255.255.0
 encapsulation frame-relay
 ip ospf network point-to-point
 no frame-relay inverse-arp
 no shutdown
!
router ospf 1
 log-adjacency-changes
 network 10.2.0.0 0.0.255.255 area 0


R4
hostname R4
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.4.4 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0
 ip address 10.2.145.4 255.255.255.0
 encapsulation frame-relay
 no shutdown
!
router ospf 1
 log-adjacency-changes
 network 10.2.0.0 0.0.255.255 area 0


R5
hostname R5
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.5.5 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0
 ip address 10.2.145.5 255.255.255.0
 encapsulation frame-relay
 no shutdown
!
router ospf 1
 log-adjacency-changes
 network 10.2.0.0 0.0.255.255 area 0

Aug 2, 2013

IPv6, I am no longer intimidated by you.


IPv6 is one of those CCNA topics I was not confident explaining to someone. I was intimidated by its new features and whenever I see those series of 32 hexadecimal numbers, I get really uneasy. So I decided to put an end to it by getting in the bottom of things with IPv6. Now I am no longer intimidated and I am glad to finally get this off of my chest. ;)

So here, I want to share my study notes on IPv6.


Some facts about IPv6

- 128 bit address; 32 hexadecimal numbers; 8 quartets of 4 hex digits
- IPsec is required on IPv6 hosts
- improvement of IPv6 header: no more recalculation of checksum for every packet sent & includes flow label for easy identifaction of packets sent over the same TCP/UDP connection
- strategic IPv6 address assignment has been adapted from IPv4 and this process is being handled by Internet Corporation for Assigned Network Numbers (ICANN)
- no more broadcast (uses multicast, unicast and anycast)

Jun 22, 2013

Making Your First Asterisk Call On a Single Machine


Using virtualization, we can try executing a basic Asterisk dialplan and make a SIP call between two Windows machines.



Requirements

1. Fully setup Asterisk call manager on your Linux Machine with configuration all set to default
2. Softphone applications (3CX) on Windows 7 host and Windows XP guest
3. Enabled Microsoft Loopback Adapter on Windows 7 host
4. Knowledge on basic networking (LAN connectivity)

Mar 10, 2012

CCNA Finally!

I have always dreamed of this day when I can finally post here as a CCNA. For 3 months (November to January), I've focused all my energy in studying for this exam and at 12PM of March 06, 2012, all of it finally paid off. It wasn't really planned that I will take the exam on that date. A week before, I have hopes of finally taking the exam but I only knew when I'll be taking the exam the day before the exam itself when my parents finally got the money they loaned. So for a month, I just waited. Good thing I have my notes with me and the CCNA Labs for light reviewing.

On the day of the exam, I have to go to the testing center to have my exam scheduled on that same day. I travelled all the way from Pasay, Metro Manila to Sampaloc, Manila. At the testing center, the staff was having problem including my discount voucher from Cisco Networking Academy and it was because I haven't entered my Academy Connection ID in my PearsonVUE account. I resolved the issue, had my photo taken and paid the balance and proceeded with the exam at 11AM. I am the only one in the exam room and I am really tensed so I tried to relax and focus on the task at hand.

An hour later and I saw the message on the screen which says "Congratulations!..." and I wasn't able to read all of it because I was swept away with emotions. I was filled with so much joy and fulfilment. :)

I can't wait for my certificate to finally reach my home and see my name on it.


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aspiring computer and network engineer, programmer, with fascination in webdesign and development

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