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Nov 2, 2013

OSPF-FR Troubleshooting Lab



The purpose of this lab is to present the two of the four OSPF network types that you can use with Frame Relay: Point-to-point and Multipoint and some issues you may encounter because mainly, OSPF works differently on each type. Wendell Odom in his book, CCNP Route Official Certification Guide outlined the three important points when using OSPF over Frame Relay which is basically the inspiration of this lab. 

To get started, paste the base configuration below for each router:

R1
hostname R1
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.1.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0
 no ip address
 encapsulation frame-relay
 no shutdown
!
interface Serial0/0.2 point-to-point
 ip address 10.2.12.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0.3 point-to-point
 ip address 10.2.13.1 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0.45 multipoint
 ip address 10.2.145.1 255.255.255.0
!
router ospf 1
 log-adjacency-changes
 network 10.2.0.0 0.0.255.255 area 0

R2
hostname R2
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0
 ip address 10.2.12.2 255.255.255.0
 encapsulation frame-relay
 ip ospf network point-to-point
 no shutdown
!
router ospf 1
 log-adjacency-changes
 network 10.2.0.0 0.0.255.255 area 0

R3
hostname R3
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.3.3 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0
 ip address 10.2.13.3 255.255.255.0
 encapsulation frame-relay
 ip ospf network point-to-point
 no frame-relay inverse-arp
 no shutdown
!
router ospf 1
 log-adjacency-changes
 network 10.2.0.0 0.0.255.255 area 0


R4
hostname R4
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.4.4 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0
 ip address 10.2.145.4 255.255.255.0
 encapsulation frame-relay
 no shutdown
!
router ospf 1
 log-adjacency-changes
 network 10.2.0.0 0.0.255.255 area 0


R5
hostname R5
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.5.5 255.255.255.0
!
interface Serial0/0
 ip address 10.2.145.5 255.255.255.0
 encapsulation frame-relay
 no shutdown
!
router ospf 1
 log-adjacency-changes
 network 10.2.0.0 0.0.255.255 area 0

Aug 2, 2013

IPv6, I am no longer intimidated by you.


IPv6 is one of those CCNA topics I was not confident explaining to someone. I was intimidated by its new features and whenever I see those series of 32 hexadecimal numbers, I get really uneasy. So I decided to put an end to it by getting in the bottom of things with IPv6. Now I am no longer intimidated and I am glad to finally get this off of my chest. ;)

So here, I want to share my study notes on IPv6.


Some facts about IPv6

- 128 bit address; 32 hexadecimal numbers; 8 quartets of 4 hex digits
- IPsec is required on IPv6 hosts
- improvement of IPv6 header: no more recalculation of checksum for every packet sent & includes flow label for easy identifaction of packets sent over the same TCP/UDP connection
- strategic IPv6 address assignment has been adapted from IPv4 and this process is being handled by Internet Corporation for Assigned Network Numbers (ICANN)
- no more broadcast (uses multicast, unicast and anycast)

Jun 22, 2013

Making Your First Asterisk Call On a Single Machine


Using virtualization, we can try executing a basic Asterisk dialplan and make a SIP call between two Windows machines.



Requirements

1. Fully setup Asterisk call manager on your Linux Machine with configuration all set to default
2. Softphone applications (3CX) on Windows 7 host and Windows XP guest
3. Enabled Microsoft Loopback Adapter on Windows 7 host
4. Knowledge on basic networking (LAN connectivity)

Mar 10, 2012

CCNA Finally!

I have always dreamed of this day when I can finally post here as a CCNA. For 3 months (November to January), I've focused all my energy in studying for this exam and at 12PM of March 06, 2012, all of it finally paid off. It wasn't really planned that I will take the exam on that date. A week before, I have hopes of finally taking the exam but I only knew when I'll be taking the exam the day before the exam itself when my parents finally got the money they loaned. So for a month, I just waited. Good thing I have my notes with me and the CCNA Labs for light reviewing.

On the day of the exam, I have to go to the testing center to have my exam scheduled on that same day. I travelled all the way from Pasay, Metro Manila to Sampaloc, Manila. At the testing center, the staff was having problem including my discount voucher from Cisco Networking Academy and it was because I haven't entered my Academy Connection ID in my PearsonVUE account. I resolved the issue, had my photo taken and paid the balance and proceeded with the exam at 11AM. I am the only one in the exam room and I am really tensed so I tried to relax and focus on the task at hand.

An hour later and I saw the message on the screen which says "Congratulations!..." and I wasn't able to read all of it because I was swept away with emotions. I was filled with so much joy and fulfilment. :)

I can't wait for my certificate to finally reach my home and see my name on it.


Feb 19, 2012

This is it... This is real world!

I am doing the lab, CCNA Labs - Cisco for the Real World in GNS3 and as of now I have reached the end of Phase 3 and I can say that this lab is amazing. I've configured familiar things which are on the CCNA scope like VLANS and Trunking, NAT, Static route. I also configured EtherChannel which is discussed in CCNA but I don't remember having configured one during labs on my Cisco Networking Academy class few years back. There are also major topics which are not in the CCNA scope like Inter-VLAN with L3 Switching and (drum roll) ... VPN configuration!

In this lab, I am to setup the Branch Office network which has different VLANS, runs VOIP, with two APs one for Public and one for Private. The Private AP is connected to the internal private network while the Public AP can only connect to the Internet. There is a SERVER which can be accessed from the Internet and hosts should be able to access the Internet by passing through NAT. Then the Branch Office must be able to connect to the Corporate Office using VPN where in the addresses must not pass NAT.

The most exciting part so far in doing this lab is connecting routers to the Internet via my Network Interface card and I am able to ping Google.com from GNS3! This is real world!

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